$4.5 Million Frank Gehry House Sells for Less Than $1 Million (artnet news)

by Eileen Kinsella, Thursday, May 21, 2015 original article here.

The guest house Frank Gehry designed for Penny and Mike Winton in 1982. Image: Courtesy of Wright, Chicago.

The guest house Frank Gehry designed for Penny and Mike Winton in 1982. Image: Courtesy of Wright, Chicago.

Despite considerable hype—including a lengthy catalogue entry with accolades from architecture experts and fellow artists—a custom built house by starchitect Frank Gehry fell far short of earlier estimates and just below the presale estimate at Wright auction house in Chicago yesterday (see Raymond Pettibon Has Gehryish Taste in Apartments and Gehry’s Eisenhower Memorial a Go, Geffen Contemporary Remodel Next?).

Winton Guest House, Gehry’s “sculptural building” composed of six geometric forms clad in a range of building materials and finishes, sold for a hammer price of $750,000 ($905,000 total) on May 19, after “five minutes of lackluster bidding,” according to the Minneapolis Star TribuneIt was once valued at $4.5 million, but estimates were tamped down to $1 million to $1.5 million for the sale, the Star Tribune reports (see Frank Gehry Fired From World Trade Center Arts Complex Job and Frank Gehry Gives Spanish Critics the Finger).

The house, which has won numerous awards, was commissioned by Minnesota arts patrons Penny and Mike Winton after they read a feature on Gehry in a 1982 edition of the New York Times Magazine. According to the Wright catalogue, the house was initially situated on the Wintons’ 12-acre Lake Minnetonka property and then moved in 2008 to Owatonna Minnesota. “Upon purchasing this work, the structure will again need to be relocated,” the catalogue states.

The six forms that make up the house include: a 35-foot tall pyramid-shaped living room finished in black painted metal; a curved bedroom covered in dolomite limestone from southern Minnesota; a cube-shaped fireplace alcove covered in brick; a rectangular garage and kitchenette covered in Finnish plywood and strips of aluminum, and a rectangular loft in galvanized steel and a second bedroom with a slanted roof, also painted in black metal.

The house was sold by the University of St. Thomas which acquired it in 2007 as a gift from Kirt Woodhouse, a real estate developer who purchased it from the Wintons in 2001.  The new owner, who was not identified will have to move the house at “substantial additional cost,” the Star Tribune reports.

Banksy Mobile Lovers Get $670,000 Price Tag from Antiques Roadshow (artnet news)

by Eileen Kinsella, Monday, June 2, 2014 original article here.

banksy-antiques-roadshow-homepage

Banksy, Mobile Lovers (2014). Courtesy Vision Invisible/Flickr.

A Banksy mural with an interesting back story could bring in over a half million dollars for a British boys club in dire need of funds.

Mobile Lovers, a work showing a man and woman seemingly locked in a passionate embrace, but actually gazing distractedly over each other’s shoulders at their cell phones, their faces lit from the glow, was valued at $670,000 (£400,000) on the Antiques Roadshow TV program. The work was brought for appraisal by a Bristol-based youth club known as the Broad Plain Boys’ Club. An added bonus, the club has a letter from the mysterious street artist himself, stating that the club can keep the work.

In April, shortly after Mobile Lovers was spotted on a wall in Bristol, it was taken down by the youth club with a crowbar. The club left a note indicating that they removed it “to prevent vandalism or damage being done,” as artnet News reported. The move was controversial, sparking some criticism that it was holding the work “hostage.” According to their note, “You are free to come and view, but a small donation will be asked for you.” The letter from Banksy, and confirmation from Banksy’s publicist Jo Brooks has seemingly quashed any question of ownership between the city of Bristol, where the artist resides, and the youth club.

In the Daily Mail, club leader Dennis Stinchcombe said he had received offers as high as $1.7 million (£1 million) for the work since the Banksy confirmation. Stinchombe said he was considering selling the work at auction but was concerned about “choosing an appropriate auctioneer and one which is respectful of the work.” His hope is that any sale proceeds “settle our finances and secure our future over the next few years at least.”

Stinchcombe had hoped to keep a low profile when he brought it to the BBC program being filmed at Ashton Court in Bristol last Thursday (May 29), but the large, distinctive work was spotted almost immediately, and crowds descended.

Banksy’s auction record is for Keep It Spotless (2007), (a playful jab at Damien Hirst), made of household gloss and spray paint on canvas, that sold for $1.9 million at Sotheby’s New York in 2008, soaring above expectations of $250,000–350,000. According to the artnet database, roughly 1,165 Banksy works have appeared at auction to date.

 

Banksy adds Nazi to thrift store painting, amps up charity’s fund-raising (NY Daily News)

BY , NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Tuesday, October 29, 2013, 8:19 PM original article here.

 

Banksy transformed this cheap nature scene into a high-priced work of art with his addition of a Nazi enjoying the view.

Banksy transformed this cheap nature scene into a high-priced work of art with his addition of a Nazi enjoying the view.

Banksy’s latest work is a Nazi who’s raising big bucks for charity.

The cagey street artist surprised the Housing Works Thrift Shop in Gramercy on Tuesday by returning a pastoral oil painting he had bought for $50, after he added a Nazi soldier sporting a swastika armband.

Store officials wasted no time in auctioning the piece on BiddingForGood.com. A bidding war started at $74,000 and stood at $201,200 as the clock struck midnight Tuesday night. No telling what the price will be when the online auction ends at 8 p.m. Thursday.

Housing Works plans to use its windfall to fund its mission of fighting homelessness and AIDS.

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

The crowd at Housing Works Thrift Shop in New York takes pictures of the latest Banksy work.

Josh Haskins, the store assistant manager, said the painting, originally done by an obscure artist named K. Sager, mysteriously appeared at the shop Tuesday morning.

“Someone showed up at the counter and told a volunteer to get the manager, saying, ‘A valuable piece of art is here,’” said Haskins. “He then just walked away.

“I took one look at it and I knew what it was,” said Haskins, 27, of Brooklyn. “I’ve been into Banksy since I was in college.”

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

Banksy fans gather to take snapshots of ‘The banality of the banality of evil,’ the artist’s latest work on sale at the Housing Works Thrift Shop.

Rebecca Edmondson, spokeswoman for Housing Works, said proceeds from the painting would help thousands.

“Housing Works is thrilled to receive such a generous donation from Banksy,” Edmondson said in a statement. “It means a lot to our organization that the artist is using his time in New York to give back to the very community that has been captivated by his every move.

“Proceeds from this one of a kind piece will do so much good for the thousands of men, women and children dealing with the dual crisis of homelessness and AIDS that still plagues our city streets.”

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

Hung just so above a couch in the Housing Works Thrift Shop, art collectors should have no trouble imagining the oil painting modified by Banksy in their own living rooms.

To the painting, Banksy added the Nazi soldier sitting on a wooden bench and staring contemplatively at the original artist’s fall landscape of a peaceful river flowing from a snowy mountain.

The famed British graffiti master signed the painting under Sager’s signature.

“A thrift store painting vandalized then re-donated to the thrift store,” Banksy wrote on his website.

Not everyone can afford $153,601 — possibly more — for a painting, even one transformed by famed street artist Banksy, so they're taking photos of it instead.

Not everyone can afford $153,601 — possibly more — for a painting, even one transformed by famed street artist Banksy, so they’re taking photos of it instead.

He titled the doctored painting: “The banality of the banality of evil.”

While Banksy didn’t offer an explanation, the work is reminiscent of a 1969 episode of Rod Serling’s TV show “Night Gallery.” In an episode titled “The Escape Route,” a Nazi war criminal, haunted by past demons and confronted by a Holocaust survivor, finds solace in a serene museum painting.

The E. 23rd St. store immediately drew a crowd of photographers and Banksy fans after the shop hung the framed 3-by-2-foot painting in the front window above a checkered pink couch.

The donation to Housing Works came just days after Banksy angered loved ones of 9/11 victims by slamming the design of 1 World Trade Center as “vanilla” and a symbol that “proclaims the terrorists won.”

Banksy has been on a month long residency in New York, tagging buildings with provocative graffiti and erecting installations in vacant lots and even on trucks roving the city.

Mexico demands Sotheby’s halt auction of artifacts (Associated Press)

By MARK STEVENSON March 21, 2013 3:17 PM

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The Mexican government is demanding that Sotheby’s auction house halt the planned sale of 51 pre-Columbian Mexican artifacts, arguing they are protected national historical pieces.

The National Institute of Anthropology and History said Wednesday that Mexico has sent a diplomatic note to the French government seeking assistance in heading off the auction scheduled in Paris for Friday and Saturday.

It also implied that some of the artifacts offered in what is known as the 300-piece Barbier-Mueller Collection of Pre-Columbian Art are fakes or imitations.

“Of the 130 objects advertised as being from Mexico, 51 are archaeological artifacts that are (Mexican) national property, and the rest are handicrafts,” the institute said in a statement.

Still, the genuine pieces are important to Mexico.

“In light of their importance for the people of Mexico, the director of the auction company has been asked to withdraw the pieces from sale,” the institute said.

Sotheby’s issued a statement Thursday saying it “has had dialogue with several nations and given careful consideration to their concerns about this sale, and we continue to welcome discussion regarding any new information on specific issues.”

The auction house said that over six months, it “thoroughly researched the provenance of this collection and we are confident in offering these works for auction.”

Sophie Dufresne, Sotheby’s spokeswoman in Paris, said: “The sale is going forward as planned.”

A description of the pieces listed on Sotheby’s Paris website describes the collection as containing pre-Hispanic sculptures in wood and stone, ceramics, textiles and ritual objects from Mexico, Central America and South America, saying the collection is “representative of all the leading pre-Columbian cultures.”

The Sotheby’s website says the collection was started by Josef Mueller in 1920. “He became attracted by important works of pre-Columbian art, his first purchase being an Aztec ‘water goddess’ in Paris in 1920,” it says.

The description says Mueller’s son-in-law, Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller, augmented and broadened the collection.

While Sotheby’s described Barbier-Mueller as “a great aesthete and man of culture,” Mexico said such collections trivialize archaeological pieces.

“The Mexican government has consistently expressed its objections to the international trade in protected cultural objects, particularly archaeological artifacts, and stresses that such practices strip these unique objects of their invaluable cultural, historical and symbolic essence, converting them into mere merchandise and curios,” the institute said.

Under a 1972 law, Mexico prohibited the purchase and sale of archaeological pieces, but allowed some previously existing collections to remain in private hands if they were registered with the government.

While the French collection may have been assembled prior to that time, Mexico has had laws prohibiting the export of such artifacts since at least 1827.

Photos of the artifacts on the Sotheby’s site show two seated depictions of godlike figures carved in stone that appear to come from Mexican pre-Hispanic cultures. The description says the collection contains Aztec, Mayan and Tarascan pieces.

A French diplomatic official said that nothing in the collection up for auction is on the French database checked by the Central Office of Cultural Property. Nor are any of the items in the Interpol database or on the “red list” of the International Council of Museums for cultural property of Central America and Mexico .

The diplomatic official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and asked not to be named, said these objects have often been shown publicly and mentioned in various catalogues since September.

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Associated Press Writers Greg Keller and Elaine Ganley in Paris contributed to this report

Works by artist Basquiat to appear at NYC exhibit (Associated Press)

Basquiat

Associated Press – Thu, Apr 18, 2013

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 30 works by artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (zhahn mee-SHEHL’ BAH’-skee-aht) will appear at a New York City exhibit before a private sale.

The exhibit at Sotheby’s galleries runs May 2 through June 9. Most will be available for sale.

They include works on paper in marker and crayon from 1979 and monumental canvases from 1987.

The Brooklyn-born Basquiat was 27 when he died of a drug overdose in 1988.

Among the highlights is “Punch Bag” from 1983 depicting a black boxer. It’s been owned by a European collector since the late 1990s.

Colorful canvas “Love Dub for A” from 1987 has been offered for sale only once before.

The auction record for a Basquiat is “Untitled,” a painting of a black fisherman that sold for $26.4 million in November.

Munch’s ‘The Scream’ may fetch $80M at NYC auction

By ULA ILNYTZKY | Associated Press – Wed, May 2, 2012

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the art world’s most recognizable images — Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” — could sell for $80 million or more when it is auctioned at Sotheby’s on Wednesday.

The 1895 pastel of a man holding his head and screaming under a streaked, blood-red sky has become a modern symbol for human anxiety, popularized in movies and plastered on everything from mugs to Halloween masks.

It is one of four versions created by the Norwegian expressionist painter. Three are in Norwegian museums; the one at Sotheby’s is the only one left in private hands. It is being sold by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen, whose father was a friend and patron of the artist.

A price tag of $80 million would be among the highest for an artwork at auction. The record is $106.5 million for Picasso’s “Nude, Green Leaves, and Bust,” sold in 2010 by Christie’s in New York.

The image has become part of pop culture, “used by everyone from Warhol to Hollywood to cartoons to teacups and T-shirts to whatever else,” said Michael Frahm of the London-based art advisory service firm Frahm Ltd.

“Together with the Mona Lisa, it’s the most famous and recognized image in art history,” he added.

Sotheby’s said its pastel-on-board version of “The Scream” is the most colorful and vibrant of the four and the only version whose frame was hand-painted by the artist to include his poem, detailing the work’s inspiration.

In the poem, Munch described himself “shivering with anxiety” and said he felt “the great scream in nature.”

Proceeds from the sale will go for the establishment of a new museum, art center and hotel in Hvitsten, Norway, where Olsen’s father and Munch were neighbors.

“I have lived with this work all my life, and its power and energy have only increased with time,” Olsen said in February. “Now, however, I feel the moment has come to offer the rest of the world a chance to own and appreciate this remarkable work.”

“It has historical importance … it helped move art history from impressionism to expressionism,” Frahm said of “The Scream.”

He predicted that “we’re going to see a new world record for a piece sold at auction.” Frahm said the sale will show that great quality artworks can still come up for sale; that the top end of the market is driving further away from the rest of the market and that it’s a global market now where Asia and the Middle East are playing a more significant role than Europe and America.

But figuring out who might buy it is trickier.

“This could really be someone who just wants to own the most iconic piece of art to come up at auction ever,” Frahm said, adding that it could be the Qatari royal family, one of the world’s biggest art buyers.

The director of the National Museum in Oslo, Audun Eckhoff, says Norwegian authorities approved the Munch sale since the other versions of the composition are in Norwegian museums. One version is owned by the National Museum and two others by the Munch Museum, also in Oslo.

Sotheby’s said a total of eight works have sold for $80 million or more at auction.

Only two other works besides Picasso’s “Nude, Green Leaves, and Bust” have sold for more than $100 million at auction. Those are Picasso’s “Boy With a Pipe (The Young Apprentice)” for $104.1 million in 2004 and Alberto Giacometti’s “Walking Man I” for $104.3 million in 2010.

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Online: http://www.sothebys.com

FILE - This undated photo provided by Sotheby's shows "The Scream" by Norwegian painter Edvard Munch. The work, which dates from 1895 and is one of four versions of the composition, will lead Sotheby's Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale in New York on May 2, 2012. (AP Photo/Sotheby's, File)

Rare Cezanne watercolor fetches $19M at NY auction – From AP

By The Associated Press | Associated Press – Tue, May 1, 2012

NEW YORK (AP) — A rare watercolor study by Paul Cezanne believed lost for nearly 60 years fetched over $19 million at a New York City auction on Tuesday.

Christie’s auction house said “A Card Player” sold to a buyer who wished to remain anonymous. The price included the buyer’s premium.

The watercolor was a study for Cezanne’s celebrated series of oil paintings titled “Card Players.” It was rediscovered this year in the collection of the late Dr. Heinz Eichenwald, a well-known collector from Dallas, Texas.

It shows a man in a hat and jacket seated at a table. Rendered in hues of blue and ochre, it was previously known to scholars only from a black-and-white photograph.

The French post-impressionist artist created the five-painting “Card Players” series between 1890 and 1896.

The preparatory study offers a rare glimpse into Cezanne’s creative process. The figure in the painting is that of Paulin Paulet, a gardener on Cezanne’s estate near Aix en Provence, France. It was last displayed at a New York gallery in 1953.

Christie’s said Eichenwald inherited the work from his father.

Its presale estimate was $15 million to $20 million.

The Courtauld Gallery in London exhibited the five-painting series in 2010; the exhibition traveled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art last year.

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Online: http://www.christies.com                       FILE - This undated file picture provided by Christie’s shows a rare watercolor study by French artist Paul Cezanne believed lost and last seen in 1953. The rare watercolor study by Paul Cezanne believed lost for nearly 60 years fetched over $19 million at a New York City auction. (AP Photo/Christie's, File)